STPC Consolidated Rules

(Last update: 1/29/2017)

 

 

Table of Contents

 

GENERAL                                                                          

Page 1

HOW TO READ THE DICE AND CARDS

Page 4

OFFENSIVE STRATEGY                                              

Page 4

PLAYER USAGE: INJURIES AND REST 

Page 4

LEFTY-RIGHTY RATINGS                                         

Page 5

POWER RATINGS (N/W)                                              

Page 5

RUNNER ADVANCEMENT ON HITS

(INCLUDES CATCHER BLOCKING PLATE)        

Page 5

FLYBALLS                                                                        

Page 7

HITTER’S PITCHING CARD                                       

Page 8

GROUNDBALL () A, B, C                                               

Page 9

FLY()X, GB()X and CATCH-X                                     

Page 10

OTHER CARD RESULTS                                              

Page 11

SACRIFICE/SQUEEZE                                                  

Page 11

HIT AND RUN                                                                   

Page 12

DEFENSIVE STRATEGY:

INFIELD BACK, INFIELD IN, CORNERS IN          

Page 12

BRINGING THE OUTFIELD IN                                 

Page 13

SUPPLEMENTARY STEALING SYSTEM              

Page 14

PICKOFFS AND BALKS                                

Page 16

INJURIES                                                                           

Page 16

RESTING BATTERS                                                      

Page 17

PITCHER ENDURANCE                               

Page 18

CLOSER RULE                                                                

Page 19

INDIVIDUAL BALKS, WILD PITCHES,

PASSED BALLS (AND DICE ROLLING)  

Page 20

BALL PARK EFFECTS /

WEATHER EFFECTS and CLUTCH HITTING    

Page 21

SPECIAL SITUATIONS AND REMEDIES FOR RULE VIOLATIONS AND MISTAKES                  

Page 22

SHOOTOUT RULES                                                       

Page 24

GAME SUSPENSION RULE

Page 25

APPENDIX  A

Page 27

 

 

These rules include the Strat-O-Matic (SOM) rules which apply to STPC Tournaments.  The SOM rules are labeled with an S and the special STPC Tournament Rules are labeled with a T.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

T

0.01

GENERAL

STPC uses most of the Super Advanced SOM Rules.  Those rules that are not used are identified throughout this document.  For example, we do not use the OUTFIELDER ROBBING A HOMERUN Rule (14.5), the DELAYED STEAL OF HOME Rule (23.9), WEATHER EFFECTS (30.5), the STARTING PITCHER REST CHART (27.51, 27.61), or the SOM method for throwing the dice (29.1).  STPC does not allow a defensive player to play at a position unless it is on his card (except for players with no position on their card [See T10.11] and certain injury situations – see T25.2).  STPC does not use the designated hitter (pitchers have to hit).

 

Since 1999, SOM has added several new rules that are used.  STPC does use the rule which decreases the bunter’s rating by two levels with the bases loaded and infield or corners in (18.31), the CATCHER BLOCKING THE PLATE RULE (13.63) and the rule that awards a home to first double play when the ball is hit to an infielder who is positioned IN with the bases loaded (See T15.0).

 

T

0.02

DRAFT

The draft will consist of 26 rounds. The even numbered rounds will draft in reverse order. Each division will consist of 8 to 14 teams. Each manager will pick 25 players and a previously un-selected ballpark. The first manager to select a ballpark may design his own park, but the dimensions must be the same for left and right. All subsequent parks must be selected from the SOM ballpark chart. Only one team per division may pick a specific park. All players will roll a 20-sided die to determine draft position.  The high roll gets the choice of where he wants to draft and, in some formats, the division.  Any imputed teams will randomly be assigned a draft position. The draft will start at 7:30 AM (or at some other time designated by the Tournament Director). If you are late, either a team will be picked for you or you will be disqualified. Computers may be used during the draft.  Auction drafts are allowed if they are publicized well in advance with clear documentation on how they would work.

 

T

0.03

PLAY

Managers may have only one page (8 1/2 x 11) of information during face-to-face play. Players using their own cards may have as much information on the cards as they wish. A computer is needed to run the SOM Game for NetPlay and a computer is needed for Skype and the dice roller for PureStrat but computers may not be used for other purposes during game play (such as help managing the game) and may never be used during face-to-face play.

 

T

0.04

MERCY GAMES

The game is over if one team has a lead of 10 runs or more after the end of a complete inning and five innings have been played. The home team does not bat if it is ahead by 10 or more runs and the visitor has completed the top of the inning.

 

T

0.05

CONCESSIONS

If someone is getting badly beaten, he may concede the game at any time (the integrity of the game and tournament must be preserved).  If the victorious team is less than 10 runs ahead at the time of concession, their run total is increased by whatever it takes to get the 10-run advantage.

 

T

0.06

RULE VIOLATIONS

See Section T31.0 for a more complete description of remedies for rule violations and mistakes.  Once a rule violation or mistake (such as the usage of an ineligible player) is discovered, the offended manager will usually have the option of accepting the result or replaying the game from the point the mistake was made.  If the result is accepted, any ineligible player must be immediately replaced (except as noted in T31).  If the ineligible player was a pitcher, the innings should be recorded as pitched with a footnote describing why the mistake was allowed.  Series results are official once the pitching sheet has been signed off or once a subsequent series has begun.  If a mistake is discovered from a completed game after a subsequent game (within that series) has begun, the offended manager has the option of accepting the result or declaring the game suspended.  If the game is suspended (see T33.0), it will be resumed (when time permits) from the point where the error was made.

 

T

0.07

All sacrifice and squeeze plays must be played out. You may not concede them.

 

T

0.08

If a Round Robin Format is used and a player is unable to complete the RR portion of his schedule, the tournament director (TD) should make every effort to find a player (or players) to play the un-played games.  If you have an odd division (i.e. an odd number of players in the division), the team on bye takes the place of the dropped player for that series.  For even divisions, the replacement players would come from outside the affected division.  Perhaps a two-player team would be willing to split up or players on bye from an odd division would agree to cover for the dropped player.  If there is more than one player covering for the dropped player, the one who gets to take over the team is determined by a roll of the 20-sider after division play has concluded.  Players within the dropped player's division and players who are already advancing (or in the tie-break round) with their other team are not eligible. If the dropped player’s team qualifies for advancement and if these limitations mean that no one (who has played the dropped player’s team) is available to continue on,  then the dropped player’s team is out and the next best team in the division (after all tie-breaks are applied) advances.   At the discretion of the TD, compensation can be offered (e.g. $5/game or whatever the TD deems appropriate) to the replacement players.

What follows deals with even divisions where no one is available to complete the dropped player's schedule. Wins and losses against the dropped player are thrown out and no automatic wins or losses are awarded for any un-played games (*).  You get a bye (no wins, no losses) for subsequent games scheduled against the dropped player.  The following is done to ensure that everyone (who remains in the pool after the drop) gets pitcher usage consistent with what it would have been had the dropped player never been part of the division:

    1- For players that did not play the dropped player, there are no adjustments made to the pitching sheet.  Games scheduled against the dropped player are byes.

    2- For the player who was the last person to face the dropped player, that series is erased from their pitching sheet and is treated as a bye.

    3- For players that did play the dropped player (not counting the dropped player's last series which is covered in 2- above), there are no adjustments made to the pitching sheet except, for their final series in division play, they must set their rotation in a manner that would have been legal for the series that they played against the dropped player (**).  As always, reliever eligibility is based upon the previous three games.  If you have five or more pitchers that are eligible to start and some of these are starter/relievers, special care must be taken in the second-to-last series if you're planning to start one of your starter/relievers in the last series as normal relief rules apply (i.e. a starter/reliever must rest two games after relieving before he can start and a starter/reliever must be eligible to relieve in a game to be eligible to start that game).  If starting pitching carries over to the next round, you set your rotation (for that next round) based upon your second-to-last series (**).

(*) When someone drops, they're no longer part of the pool.  When division play is over, you want to know who the best team is from that pool and since the dropped team is no longer there, it follows that wins and losses against that team shouldn't count.  The reason for eliminating forfeit wins is that they unjustifiable improve a player's record which would likely improve their seeding in the shootout round and in a consolation tourney (if any).

(**) Without this provision, some players might get more starts from their #1 starting pitcher (in games that count) than other players in the division.

 

T

0.09

The Tournament Director will review the tournament format and tie-breaker procedures before the tournament begins. The Tournament Director resolves all disputes.

 


 

T

0.10

Some SOM rules are often missed.  They are summarized here.  See references for the complete text.

 

When a runner is held, subtract 1 from his run rating and if NOT held, add 1.  (S 13.2)

 

On a fly(rf)B only, a runner at second base may advance with the usual calculations except a roll of 20 is the only chance for getting thrown out. (S 14.3)

 

You may advance the trail runners on a fly B? (S 14.4)

 

You may hit and run after checking for a good lead and not getting it. (S 19.0)

 

HBP does NOT count towards weakness dots. (S 27.3)

 

T

0.12

You may not have more than one imputed team (i.e. a team drafted by DSIM) per division.  Exception1: If you have 13 participants, you may divide up into two divisions with one of those divisions having two imputed teams.  Exception2: if you have only six players in a tourney, you must have two imputed teams.  Note that this means you must have at least six participants for a sanctioned STPC tournament.

 

T

0.13

Visiting team names starting pitcher first. 

 

T

0.14

Without the acquiescence of the opponent, a player may not request nor may other players offer assistance.  This rule covers game play and extends from the roll for home to the signing of the opponents pitching sheet.  This rule includes (but is not limited to) the following kinds of assistance:

 

1) help making out a line-up

2) help making a substitution

3) help with strategy such as infield/outfield position or bunt, hit&run etc.

 

Note this includes subtle comments such as, "Don't you have a closer?"  Rule clarifications and help interpreting a dice-roll result are not considered to be outside help and may be requested or offered at any time by anyone.

 

T

0.15

Legal (See T10.11) substitutions (i.e. a player from the bench is brought in and replaces a player in the line-up) can be made at any time and any sequence of legal moves may be made immediately after a substitution.  However, defensive moves that don’t involve substitutions (for example, having your LF and CF swap positions) may only be made at the beginning of each half inning. Exception: If the Hitter's Pitching card is pitching, you may (under certain circumstances - see T25.3) make mid-inning defensive moves that involve the pitcher.  (There are exceptions for mistakes and rule violations – see Section 31.)

 

T

0.16

When a roll of the 20-sider is used to determine home or away for a series, the player that gets the high roll will have the choice of being home or away for the first game.  The rest of the series is predetermined (e.g. Home/Away/Home/Away).  The winner of the die roll has one minute to make his choice and is home for the first game if he hasn’t chosen within one minute.

 

T

0.17

For NetPlay Series only, computer results are accepted even when they differ from what these rules would call for.   Note: Does not mean that you can intentionally violate these rules.  For example, a 1W pitcher can’t hit & run per T19.11 even though the computer would let you do it.

 

T

0.18

If it's your turn to draft and you announce an eligible player's name, that person is on your team.  Exception: Through the first selection of the 7th round, a pick may be rescinded if a player has selected two non-pitchers that only play one position and those two positions are the same (i.e. a double-up pick).  The player making the double-up pick must announce his intention to pull back his latest pick before the next two drafters have made their selections.  In the unlikely event that a drafter made a selection (or selections, if he's on the end) after the double-up pick, he may select a different player (or players, if he's on the end) if he wishes before the double-up drafter selects a different player. 


S

1.0

HOW TO READ THE DICE AND CARDS

Typically, each batter's roll involves all three 6-sided dice. The 20-sided die is used for secondary rolls (such as "split chances," fielding and base running).  When rolling the three 6-sided dice, read the white die first, and then add the two colored dice together. If the white die comes up 1, 2, or 3, refer to the appropriate column on the batter's card. If it is 4, 5, or 6, refer to the pitcher's card. The two colored dice will total 2 through 12. Cross-reference the sum of the colored dice with the appropriate line in the correct column. Example: A white 3, a colored 2 and a colored 6 would be read as 3-8 (batter's column No. 3, result No. 8). A white 4, a colored 1 and a colored 5 would be read as 4-6 (pitcher's column No. 4, result No. 6). Splits: Some readings on the player cards require a second roll. Say the roll was 1-5 and the card read HOMERUN 1-10, DOUBLE 11-20. Roll the 20-sided die. If between 1 and 10, it’s a homerun; if 11 and  20, it is a double.  See T29.1 and T29.11 for more on dice rolling.

 

S

7.0

OFFENSIVE STRATEGY

You may use all the strategies that big-league managers use (intentionally walk batters, change pitchers, pinch-hit, bunt, steal, hit&run etc.). You must announce your strategy to your opponent before rolling the dice for any of these changes.  If you’re simply swinging away, you should announce your next scheduled hitter but this is assumed if you say nothing.  The offense shouldn’t quick-roll their opponent and should wait a second or two between rolls to allow the defense to call time to make a move.  A player may take back an announced decision up until the dice are rolled or until his opponent announces his decision.  Note that a declared intent to do nothing (e.g. “Go ahead”) counts as a decision.  Example: I announce a pinch hitter and before the dice are rolled or my opponent announces a pitching change, I can change my mind without penalty.

 

S

10.0

PLAYER USAGE: INJURIES AND REST

 

S

10.1

A manager may not make a substitution if doing so prevents him from legally (see T10.11) covering all defensive positions except you can pinch-hit or pinch run for your last eligible pitcher.

 

T

10.11

Hitter Eligibility and Usage.  Position players must have 300 AB+W (at bats + walks). If the player has a catcher rating on his card he needs to have only 250 AB+W. Players with no position on their card are 1b-5e30. Unless forced by an injury, players may only play at positions that are on their card (See Section 31 for exceptions).  Teams must have a back-up at each position (See T31.10). Position players that started the game may not be replaced until the sixth inning unless injured or the opposing manager changes his pitcher. (In this later case, changes may not be made until the new pitcher takes the mound). A relief pitcher entering the game before the sixth inning must bat in the same position in the lineup as the pitcher he’s replacing except that a relief pitcher may enter the game in the spot of an injured player if the batter (or subsequent pinch runner) who pinch hit for the pitcher can cover the position of the injured player.  Pitchers may not pinch hit for position players but they may pinch run.  If you hit for your pitcher in the bottom of the 5th inning, the pinch hitter may stay in the game.  Unless forced by an injury (See T25.2), a manager may not remove a player from the game if doing so makes it impossible to cover all defensive positions.  Exception: You may pinch hit or pinch run for your last eligible pitcher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


T

10.2

Pitcher Eligibility and usage.  Relievers must have 40 innings and a relief rating on their cards. Starters must have 125 innings and a starter rating on his card. Each team must have at least 4 pitchers who can start.  Starters must be removed at the end of the 10th inning and, unless injured (see T25.2), can’t be removed until he has pitched 5 innings or given up 4 or more runs. A pitcher who starts must rest 3 games before pitching again. A S/R or R/S must rest at least three games before starting after relieving. A reliever may not pitch more than 4 innings in any 4 consecutive games. A reliever may never pitch in 4 consecutive games. To determine how many innings a reliever can pitch in the current game, add up the innings pitched in the previous 3 games and subtract from 4. (Note: This doesn’t work when finishing a suspended game.  See Section 32.0.)  If a pitcher does not retire a batter, he still gets credit for pitching in that game. A pitcher may not enter the game to pitch or remain in the game to pitch if he is not eligible to retire a batter. A position player must pitch if the last eligible pitcher has reached their inning maximum or was removed for a pinch hitter or pinch runner (See T25.3 and the Hitter’s Pitching Card on Page 8).  You may pinch hit or pinch run for your last eligible pitcher.  See Section T31 for more on eligibility.  For face-to-face tournaments, the Tournament Director will provide a pitching sheet to each participant.  This sheet is used to record the innings pitched for each pitcher and is signed by the opposing manager after each series.  EXCEPTION: For NetPlay and PureStrat series only, bull pen resets before every 4-game series during round-robin play.

 

S

11.0

LEFTY-RIGHTY RATINGS

 

S

11.1

For the batter, use only the left side of the card when he is facing a left-handed pitcher; use only the right side of the card when he is facing a right-handed pitcher.  For the pitcher, use only the left side of the card when he is facing a left-handed batter; use only the right side of the card when he is facing a right-handed batter.  Check the upper left corner of the batter's card to determine if he hits left (L), right (R) or is a switch-hitter (S). A switch-hitter must bat left-handed against right-handed pitchers and right-handed against left-handed pitchers.  The hitting style of the pitcher is indicated as the last letter in his batting rating at the top of the Advanced side of his card. Example: #1WR indicates this pitcher uses Pitcher's Hitting Card No. 1, with W power and is a right-handed hitter. Check the top of the Advanced side of the pitcher's card to determine whether he throws right or left.

 

S

12.0

POWER RATINGS (N/W)

Strat-O-Matic limits the ability of low-power batters to hit homeruns off pitcher’s cards.  You will find each batter's power ratings below his name, and above his hitting columns, on the Advanced side of his card. The possibilities are N for normal power and W for weak power. Some batters may be N against left-handed or right-handed pitching, and W against the other.

 

S

12.1

The letter “N” precedes all homerun readings on pitcher’s cards. The hitter must have "N" power for this roll to result in a homerun. If the batter's power rating is "W" then any homerun chance becomes a SINGLE** (all other runners advance two bases).

 

S

12.11

If the result is split and the subsequent roll of the 20-sided die is in the range of the second result, always accept that reading, even if it is a double or triple.

 

S

13.0

RUNNER ADVANCEMENT ON HITS

 


S

2.2

A single followed by one asterisk (*) indicates an automatic one-base advance for all runners. A single or double followed by two asterisks (**) indicates an automatic two-base advance for all runners. A single followed by no asterisk (open single) is a one-base advance and a double followed by no asterisk (open double) is a two-base advance.  However, when no asterisk is present, the manager of the team at bat may elect to have his runners attempt to advance an extra base.   See Appendix A.

S

2.22

When there are two outs, add 2 to all runner's running rating before rolling the die.  (Note: does not apply to the batter or to runners who are tagging up on a fly ball.)

 

 

 

S

13.1

An outfielder's throwing arm will affect all base running attempts for an additional base on singles and doubles not followed by asterisks and some fly balls. In most cases, the advanced side of player cards show which outfielder should be used (cf, lf, rf). If there is no outfield symbol, assume the throw is to be made by the center fielder.  (Exception: On an open DOUBLE/flyout split or and open SINGLE/flyout split, assume that the ball is hit to the fielder identified in the flyout when the fielder is not identified in the hit result). Each outfielder's arm is indicated at the top of the Advanced side of his card. You will find it in parentheses, after his first outfield position.  This number is added to the runners run rating (along with other adjustments) to determine the safe chance for the runner.  After all adjustments, the maximum is 19 and the minimum is 1.  See Appendix A.

 

S

13.2

When a runner is held on first or second base, subtract 1 from his running rating when that rating is needed to determine whether he can advance an extra base on another player's hit. If the runner is not being held, add 1 to his running rating.  When using the cutoff rule on an open single or open double with the bases loaded or runners on first and second base, the trail runners are considered held if the lead runner is held.  The normal defensive penalty for holding the runner is applied but only for the lead runner (See S23.83).  See Appendix A.

 

S

13.4

On throws from rightfield to third base, increase the runner's rating by 2.  On throws from leftfield to third base, decrease the runner's rating by 2.  See Appendix A.

 

T

13.5

STPC does not use Rule 13.5 as this rule was over-ridden by new rule 13.611.

 

S

13.6

CUTOFF RULE – OPEN DOUBLE OR OPEN SINGLE  (See Appendix A.)  In what follows, the lead runner is the runner that may attempt to score or advance from 1st to 3rd on an open single.  The lead trail runner is the next runner and may be the batter.

 

S

13.61

When a manager decides to try to score a runner from first base on a double followed by no asterisks, or the runner from second base on a single followed by no asterisks, the defensive manager has the choice of throwing home or conceding the run, thereby preventing the trail runner(s) from advancing.

 

T

13.611

Note: This rule also applies when a runner tries to go from 1st to 3rd on a single with no asterisks (with no runner on 2nd).  In this case, the lead trail runner is the batter but do not apply the -5.

 

S

13.62

If the defense throws for the lead runner, the offensive manager must decide whether to allow the trail runner(s) to attempt to advance an extra base.

 

S

13.621

Calculate the lead trail runner's chances as: Running rating -5 plus the outfielder's arm, plus the adjustment for runner hold (-1 if held, +1 if not held, rule 13.2 applies). Example: Lead trail runner's running rating is 1-15, and center fielder's arm is -2 and this runner is being held on base. Safe chance is 1-7 (15-5-2-1 = 7). The calculation may not be lower than 1. Don't forget to add 2 if there are two outs (except if the trail runner is the batter), and to make any adjustments for outfield location if the throw is to third base (+2 if throw is from right field, -2 if throw is from left field).  Do not apply the -5 to the batter if the lead runner is trying to go from 1st to 3rd on an open single.

 

S

13.622

If the offensive manager chooses to hold the trail runner(s), then the throw is automatically made for the lead runner by the defense. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the runner is safe or out.

 


 

S

13.623

If the offensive manager has decided to send the lead runner and let the trail runner(s) try to advance, then the defensive manager must choose one of two options:

A.    Throw for the lead runner. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the runner is safe or out. The trail runner(s) advance an extra base.

B.    Cut off the throw and attempt to throw out the lead trail runner. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the lead trail runner is safe. Other trail runners, if any, automatically advance. The lead runner automatically advances (and scores if he was heading home), even if the trail runner is out for the third out of the inning.

 

S

13.63

CATCHER BLOCKING THE PLATE

Whenever there is a tag play at the plate on a throw that originates from the outfield, the catcher’s defensive ability may be challenged and it can make the difference between a runner being called safe or out.  The rule comes into play when you are rolling the 20-sided die to determine if the runner is safe or out at home.  If the last number in the safe range or the first number in the out range is rolled, then the catcher’s ability will be checked with another roll of the 20-sided die.  For instance, if the safe range (after all adjustments have been made) is 1-14 and you roll a 14 or 15 on the 20-sided die, then you must roll the 20-sided die again and refer to the following chart to determine if the runner is safe or out:

 

              Catcher’s Rating    Safe        Out

              ----------------    ----       -----

                      1           1-2        3-20

                      2           1-6        7-20

                      3           1-10       11-20

                      4           1-14       15-20

                      5           1-18       19-20

 

S

3.0

FLYBALLS

The abbreviation in parentheses indicates which fielder the ball was hit to:  (lf)-left fielder, (cf)-center fielder, (rf)-right fielder.

 

S

3.1

In each case, batter is out.  If the out is not the 3rd out, on a Flyball()A, all runners tag up and advance 1 base.  On a Flyball()B, a runner from third scores on the Sac Fly.  On a Flyball()C, all runners hold.

 

S

14.0

fly()B? and fly(rf)B  (See Appendix A.)

 

S

14.2

For fly()B?, if the caught fly ball is not the third out, a runner at third base does not automatically score, as he would on fly()B. The offensive manager must decide whether to attempt to have the runner score, or to hold him at third base. To attempt to score, add the runner's running rating, plus the outfielder's arm, +2. The result may not be higher than 1-19 or lower than 1. Roll the 20-sided die to determine if the runner is out or safe.  Note that the CUTOFF RULE applies (See S14.4).

Example: 1-14 runner vs. a -1 outfield arm. Safe = 1-15 (1-14, minus 1, plus 2).

 

S

14.3

On a fly(rf)B, a runner at second base may advance with this calculation: Runner's Running rating plus right fielder's arm, +2 for the throw to third base from right field. Roll the 20-sided die. However, the only OUT chance is the split chance of 20. If the roll is higher than the highest safe chance but lower than 20, the runner holds at second base.  Note that a runner at first always holds on a fly() B.

Example: A 1-14 runner and a -1 arm. Safe: 1-15; Hold: 16-19; Out: 20.

 

S

14.32

NOTE: This rule does not apply to fly(rf)B? readings from cards or to F2 readings from the Super Advanced Fielding Chart (See S16.7).

 


 

S

14.4

CUTOFF RULE: fly()B?

If there is a runner at third base and at least one more runner on base when a fly()B? reading occurs, and if the offense decides to send the runner home, the defense has the option of cutting off the throw to the plate.

 

S

14.41

By cutting off the throw, he allows the runner from third base to score, but "holds" the other runner(s).

 

S

14.42

If the defense throws home, the offensive manager must decide whether to allow the trail runner(s) to attempt to advance.

 

S

14.43

Calculate the lead trail runner's chances as: Running rating -5, plus the outfielder's arm.

Example: Lead trail runner's running rating is 1-15, and center fielder's arm is -2. Safe chance is 1-8 (15‑5-2 = 8). The calculation may not be lower than 1. As with attempts to advance on hits for throws from rightfield to third base, increase the runner's rating by 2. On throws from leftfield to third base, decrease the runner's rating by 2.

 

S

14.431

If the offensive manager chooses to hold the trail runner(s), then the throw is automatically made to home by the defense. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the runner is safe or out.

 

S

14.432

If the offensive manager has decided to send the runner home and let the trail runner(s) try to advance, then the defensive manager must choose one of two options:

A.    Let the throw go through to home. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the runner is safe or out. The trail runner(s) advance.

B.    Cut off the throw and attempt to throw out the lead trail runner. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the lead trail runner is safe. Other trail runners (if any) automatically advance. The run automatically scores, even if the trail runner is out for the third out of the inning.

 

T

14.5

STPC does not use the OUTFIELDER ROBBING A HOMERUN RULE.

 

 

 

 

See T25.3 for more on how and when to use the Hitter’s Pitching Card.

 

                                                                              bk-20       wp-20         e51                             pitcher-5 relief(1)/N

HITTER’S PITCHING CARD                                                                         hold +9 

50 % AGAINST LEFT-HAND BATTERS

50 % AGAINST RIGHT-HAND BATTERS

4

5

6

4

5

6

2-gb(p)B

2-SINGLE**

2-SINGLE**

2-gb(p)B

2-SINGLE**

2-SINGLE**

3-GB(1b)X

3-FLY(cf)X

3-gb(1b)C

3-GB(1b)X

3-FLY(cf)X

3-gb(1b)C

4-GB(2b)X

4-GB(2b)X

4-GB(3b)X

4-GB(2b)X

4-GB(2b)X

4-GB(3b)X

5-strikeout

5-GB(ss)X

5-fly(cf)B

5-strikeout

5-GB(ss)X

5-fly(rf)B

6-WALK

6-N-HR

6-WALK

6-WALK

6-N-HR

6-WALK

7-WALK

7-SINGLE**

7-SI*  1-17

   lo(ss)  18-20

7-WALK

7-SINGLE**

7-SI*  1-17

   lo(ss)  18-20

8-N-HR

8-popout(3b)

8-SINGLE(rf)

8-N-HR

8-lineout(ss)

8-SINGLE(lf)

9-N-HR  1-16

    TR  17-20

9-gb(2b)C

9-DOUBLE(cf)

9-N-HR  1-16

    TR  17-20

9-gb(2b)C

9-DOUBLE(cf)

10-N-HR

10-GB(ss)X

10-CATCH-X

10-N-HR

10-GB(ss)X

10-CATCH-X

11-FLY(lf)X

11-FLY(rf)X

11-GB(p)X

11-FLY(lf)X

11-FLY(rf)X

11-GB(p)X

12-gb(p)B

12-DOUBLE(rf)

12-FLY(cf)X

12-gb(p)B

12-DOUBLE(lf)

12-FLY(cf)X

 

 


 

S

4.0

GROUNDBALL () A, B, C

The abbreviation in parentheses indicates which fielder the ball was hit to:(p)-pitcher, (c)-catcher, (1b)-first baseman, (2b)-second baseman, (3b)-third baseman, (ss)-shortstop.

 

T

15.0

         GROUNDBALL RESULT CHART (Pitcher and Hitter Cards)

                                 |

BALL HIT TO FIELDER WHO IS BACK  | BALL HIT TO FIELDER WHO IS IN

                                 |

BO (*)   GBA     GBB     GBC     |  BO (*)   GBA     GBB     GBC

------  ------  ------  ------   |  ------  ------  ------  ------

1       DP43    Force   Runadv   |  1       DP43    Force   Runadv

2       RightC  RightC  Runadv   |  2       RightC  RightC  Runadv

3       Deep    Deep    Runadv   |  3       Batter  Leadr   Batter

12      DP43    Force   Runadv   |  12      DP43    Force   Runadv

13      DP43    Force   Runadv   |  13      Batter  Leadr   Batter

23      Deep    Deep    Runadv   |  23      Batter  Leadr   Batter

123     DP43    Force   Runadv   |  123     DP23    Leadr   Leadr

                                 |

 

                   GROUNDBALL RESULT CHART (X-Chart)

                                 |

BALL HIT TO FIELDER WHO IS BACK  | BALL HIT TO FIELDER WHO IS IN

                                 |

BO (*)   G1      G2      G3      |  BO (*)   G1      G2      G3

------  ------  ------  ------   |  ------  ------  ------  ------

1       DP43    Force   Runadv   |  1       DP43    Force   Runadv

2       RightX  RightX  RightX   |  2       RightX  RightX  Runadv

3       Runadv  Runadv  Runadv   |  3       Batter  Leadr   Decide

12      DP54    Force   Runadv   |  12      DP43    Leadr   Runadv

13      DP43    Force   Runadv   |  13      Batter  Batter  Leadr

23      Runadv  Runadv  Runadv   |  23      Batter  Leadr   Decide

123     DP43    Force   Runadv   |  123     DP23    Leadr   Leadr

                                 |

(*) BO = Bases Occupied

 

For all groundballs with a runner on 3b, the pitcher & catcher are always considered IN except with runners on 1b and 3b only, the pitcher and catcher are in the same position as the middle infielders.  With no runner on 3b, pitcher & catcher are always BACK.

 

RESULTS

Batter - Batter out, runners advance only if forced.

Decide - Lead runner can attempt to advance a base (compute his safe chances as: Running speed minus 4 plus fielders defensive rating; max safe range is 1-19).  If the offensive manager decides to attempt this, the defense must then decide if it wants to take the sure out at 1b (batter is automatically out and all runners advance 1 base) or try to throw out the lead runner (the batter is then safe and other runners advance 1 base).  Note that on a groundball hit to the catcher, if the lead runner is on 3b, he holds and batter is out at 1b.

Deep - If hit to 2b or ss – Batter out, runners advance one base.  Otherwise, batter out, runners hold.

DP23 - Batter out, runner on 3b out – double play.  Other runners advance 1 base.

DP43 - Batter out, runner on 1b out – double play.  Other runners advance 1 base.

DP54 - If the ball is hit to the catcher or the 3b, then the result is a 3b to 2b double-play (batter is safe). Otherwise, see DP43.

Force - Batter safe, runner at 1b out going to 2b.  Other runners advance one base.

Leadr - Batter safe, lead runner is out, other runners advance one base.

RightC - If hit to 1b or 2b, batter out, runner advances one base.  Otherwise, batter out, runner holds.

RightX - If hit to 1b or 2b, batter out, runner advances 1 base. If hit to 3b, batter out, runner holds. If hit to ss, Pitcher or Catcher, See Decide.

Runadv - Batter out, runners advance one base.

 

S

16.0

FLY()X, GB()X and CATCH-X

 

S

16.1

"X-chance" readings, abbreviated as shown above, are obtained from the pitcher's card.

A.    A range rating (from 1, the best, to 5, the worst) that determines whether the fielder will catch the ball or whether it will become a hit.

B.    Throwing arms for outfielders (from -6, the best, to +5, the worst) and catchers (from -5, the best, to +5, the worst). These are indicated in parentheses immediately after the range rating. Note that an outfielder's arm rating is the same, no matter which outfield position he is playing.

C.    Error ("e") ratings determine the frequency of the player's errors at each position. The lower the "e" rating, the fewer errors the fielder will commit.

D.    A "T" rating for catchers only. This range of numbers (1-3, 1-9, etc.) is the range for possible throwing errors on successful stolen bases.

E.    A passed ball "(pb)" rating for catchers only. This number indicates the highest number in a range that begins with 0 for possible passed balls.

 

S

16.4

Consult the Super Advanced Fielding Charts (two 2-sided charts). The 20-sided die and all three 6-sided dice will be rolled on every reference to resolve "X chances" (See T29.11).  Also note that instead of reading the white die separately, the three 6-sided dice are added to reach a result ranging from 3-18.

 

S

16.41

Also note that in addition to the usual hits, errors and outs, the Super Advanced Fielding Chart contains a variety of Rare Plays. Here you will find such plays as inside-the-park homeruns, catcher's interference, the hidden ball trick and many more exciting surprises!

 

S

16.42

Resolve "X chances" this way (See T29.11 for more on dice rolling):

A.    Roll the 20-sided die and refer to the Range Section of the X-Chart and cross-reference the number rolled with the fielding range rating (1-5) for the defensive player in question. Obtain the correct reading.

B.    Then roll all three 6-sided dice, add them and refer to the Error Section of the X-Chart by finding the row with the defensive player's "e" rating. The possible readings are RP (rare play), E1 (1-base error), E2 (2-base error), E3 (3-base error), or no reading at all (which means no error).

C.    Take the two symbols derived from the above steps and match them in the appropriate Symbols Chart to determine the outcome of the play.

Example: A reading of GB(1b)X and a first baseman who is rated as 1b-4e15. The 20-sided die roll is 5. Cross-reference the 5 with the range rating of 4 in the Range Section for 1B/2B/SS/3B and find "SI1." Then roll all three 6-sided dice (a 6, 5, and a 1) and add them as 12. In the Error Section for First Base, find the "E RAT" of 15 and read across. The dice roll number 12 appears under the column marked E1. Now go to the Symbols Chart, find the "SI1 section" and look at play result "E1." Final result: Single and one-base Error.

 

S

16.5

If a "PO" rare play occurs with fewer than two out and runners on first and second bases, or with the bases loaded, consider this an Infield Fly Rule play - the batter is out and the runners hold. Otherwise, accept this play as a single.

 

Correction from 2002: The SI1 RP found on the 1B/2B/SS/3B/Pitcher X-Chart should only be used on a groundball to 1st , 2nd or Pitcher.  If the groundball is hit anywhere else, then consider this a single with runners advancing one base.   (A grounder to the left side will not hit a runner on first base).

 

S

16.6

Special Instruction for Catcher X-Chart: If the reading is "P/P" or "P/F" and no error occurs, there is a possible passed ball if there are also runners on base. See S29.3.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

S

16.7

A runner on 2nd may attempt to tag and advance to 3rd on an F2 off the X-Chart (where no error or rare play).  Safe chance is running rating plus arm and do make the appropriate adjustment for throws to third base.  Note: The runner will be either out or safe (there is no ‘hold’ option here).  See Appendix A.

 

S

17.0

OTHER CARD RESULTS

 

S

17.12

Convert the "gb()+" to a SINGLE** ONLY when the infield is all the way in. When the team in the field is playing only Corners In, do not award a SINGLE** on a "gb()+". Instead, treat it as a groundball without the "+". Extra hits when the defensive team is playing Corners In occur on the Super Advanced Fielding Chart (See S20.7 – S20.75)

 

S

17.13

Also, do not award a SINGLE** on a "gb()+" while runners are being held on base (See S23.8 – S23.85).

 

S

17.2

“lomax" is a line-out with at least one runner (always the lead runner) doubled off.

 

S

17.22

When this result occurs in a situation where a triple play could occur, the result is not an automatic triple play. Instead, roll the 20-sided die. If the roll is 1-7, it's a lineout/triple play. If the roll is 8-20, it's a lineout/double play, with the lead runner doubled off.

 

S

18.0

SACRIFICE / SQUEEZE

 

T

18.01

If the defensive manager hasn’t stated his defensive positioning, the offensive manager must ask the defensive manager about his defensive positioning before bunting (sac or squeeze). The defensive manager responds with the infield position and optionally states which runners are being held.  If the offensive manager forgets to ask and the result would have been different with the infield positioned differently, the defensive manager has a choice of re-roll or accepting the result.

 

S

18.1

These bunts may not be used when there are two out or no runners on base. The Sacrifice may not be used when there is a runner at third base (except you may sacrifice when there is a runner on first and third only – See 18.4). The Squeeze Play may be used ONLY when there is a runner at third base.

 

S

18.31

With the bases loaded and the corners or infield positioned in, downgrade the bunting rating two levels instead of one level.  This is because there is a force play at home plate.  Note: The worst possible adjusted bunting rating continues to be a rating of E.

 

S

18.4

The Sacrifice also may be used with runners at first and third base in order to move the runner from first to second. Simply use the sacrifice as you would in other situations and follow the results. However, in all instances, the runner on third base remains there, even if the batter beats out the bunt for a hit. If the batter pops out into a double play, the runner on first is doubled-up and the runner on third base holds.

 

S

18.5

Use the individual bunting ratings and the Sacrifice Bunt Chart and Squeeze Chart on the Super Advanced Miscellaneous Charts (which are on the reverse side of the Super Advanced Fielding Chart). There are a variety of different readings on these charts, some involving the bunter's speed or the fielder's defense. The necessary procedures and the results are explained on these charts.

 

S

18.6

If the defense is playing the Infield In or Corners In, then the bunter's rating is reduced one grade (Example: An A bunter becomes a B).  Note: Reduction is two grades with the bases loaded and infield (or corners) in.  (See S18.31).

 

S

18.7

A runner may be held on base when the infield is playing Back or corners in.  Runners can not be held with the infield in.

 


 

S

18.8

If a reading of 1AND2 occurs after a bunt attempt, the offense may not attempt a hit-and-run.

 

T

18.9

A manager may not pinch hit after a reading of 1AND2 on a bunt attempt but he may attempt a steal.

 

S

19.0

HIT AND RUN

 

S

19.1

The Hit and Run may not be used with a runner on third base.

 

T

19.11

The Hit and Run may not be used if the batter is a 1W hitting pitcher.

 

T

19.2

You may Hit and Run with two outs.

 

S

19.3

If the defense is playing the infield in, corners in or if a runner is being held on base, then the batter's hit-and-run rating is improved one grade (Example: The batter's B hit-and-run rating becomes an A).

 

S

19.5

Use the individual hit-and-run ratings and the Hit and Run tables on the Super Advanced Miscellaneous Charts (which are on the reverse side of the Super Advanced Fielding Chart). There are a variety of different readings on these charts, some involving the pitcher's card.

 

S

19.6

Runners may be held on base when the infield is playing Back or with Corners In.

 

S

19.7

The Hit and Run is not permitted after a bunt-attempt reading of 1AND2.

 

S

19.8

When using the Supplementary Stealing system and the result of the Hit and Run is "batter misses pitch", roll (*) to determine whether the lead runner achieved his "good lead" only if the runner had not already attempted to do so before the hit and run was employed. He does not get a second attempt at a "good lead." Even if the lead runner does not achieve a good lead, he must attempt to steal (See S23.7). If there are runners at 1st and 2nd attempting a double-steal, the catcher's throw is for the lead runner.  If the lead runner is on 2nd and fails to get a good lead, he is out stealing on the BMP.

 

(*) As with a normal steal attempt, the roll begins with the 20-sider to see if a pick-off or balk occurs.  If neither of those occurs, the good lead is not achieved and the runner is out if stealing 3rd or must steal off the back number if stealing 2nd.

 

S

19.9

On a Hit and Run, if a lineout reading is rolled on the pitcher’s card, override the result to lineout-max (including missed ballpark singles that result in line-outs).

 

S

20.0

DEFENSIVE STRATEGY: INFIELD BACK, INFIELD IN, CORNERS IN

The normal infield position is Infield Back. But there are times when it is important to reduce the batter's bunting ability and to cut down the chance of a runner scoring from third on a ground ball. Then, the team in the field will want to bring the Infield In or bring in the corner infielders (the third baseman and the first baseman) while leaving the middle infielders (the second baseman and the shortstop) back. With the Corners In, the team in the field cuts down on the batting team's ability to score the runner from third base on a ground ball, but also slightly diminishes its own ability to turn a double play. Meanwhile, the batter's ability to hit safely increases. With the Infield In, the effects are much greater: Chances that the runner will score from third on a groundball are sharply reduced, but double-play possibilities are significantly diminished. The batter's ability to hit safely rises dramatically. With either Infield In or Corners In, the batter's bunting ability is reduced.  Infield is always Back with two outs or no one on.

 

S

20.11

With the Infield In or Corners In, reduce the batter's bunting rating by one grade. Example: An A bunter becomes a B bunter.  Reduce two grades if the bases are loaded and infield (or corners) in(see S18.31).

 

S

20.2

The manager of the team in the field has the choice of Infield Back, Infield In and Corners In.

 

 

S

20.3

Infield In may be chosen only when third base is occupied with less than 2 outs.

 

S

20.4

Use the Groundball Result Chart (T15.0) for all ground balls (including ground balls off the X Charts).

 

T

20.5

With a runner on third base with less than 2 outs, always consider the pitcher and catcher to be playing IN for all groundballs (including the X Charts).  Exception: If there are runners on 1st and 3rd only, the pitcher and catcher are in the same position as the middle infielders. With no runner on 3rd, the pitcher and catcher are BACK.  (See T15.0)

 

S

20.6

With Infield In, convert any batter's card groundball followed by a "+" to SINGLE**.

 

S

20.61

With Infield In, convert any Super Advanced X-Chart result followed by "#" to read "SI2" (single, with all other runners advancing two bases).

 

S

20.7

CORNERS IN

The manager of the defensive team may position his infield as Corners In until there are two outs, whenever a runner is on any base.  With Corners In, use these rules:

 

S

20.71

Do not award a SINGLE** for a batter's card groundball followed by a "+". Treat the play as if the "+" did not appear (even if the ball is hit to the first or third baseman).

 

S

20.72

On a groundball hit to the first or third baseman, follow the rules for Infield In (including changing X-Chart results followed by a "#" to read "SI2" but S20.71 applies). 

 

S

20.73

On a groundball to the second baseman or shortstop, follow the rules for Infield Back.

 

S

20.74

Rule 20.5 applies.

 

S

20.75

Any runner (or combination of runners) also may be held on base when the infield is positioned as Corners In.

 

S

20.8

For gb()X results, refer to the Super Advanced Fielding Chart. If the result is G1, G2 or G3 with no error or rare play, see T15.0 to determine runner advancement.   

 

S

21.0

BRINGING THE OUTFIELD IN

 

S

21.1

This strategy can only be used when the potential winning run is on third base with fewer than two outs and the game can end on a sacrifice fly. If the defensive manager positions the outfield IN, make these adjustments:

 

S

21.2

On a reading of "fly()B?" subtract 7 from the runner's speed instead of adding 2 (See Appendix A).

 

S

21.3

Consider all readings of "fly()A" and "fly()B" to be a single with the runner on third scoring.

 

 


 

S

23.0

SUPPLEMENTARY STEALING SYSTEM

In this system, each runner is rated for the frequency with which he runs (the ability to get a good lead) and his success rate. He will be working against both the catcher's throwing arm and the pitcher's ability to hold runners close to the base.

 


T

23.01

Unless otherwise notified by the defensive manager, all * runners are presumed held at first base when second base is unoccupied.  The offensive manager must ask the defensive manager if the runner is being held before attempting a steal of third, home or second for non * runners.  If not asked, the defensive manager can accept the result of the lead-try roll or request that the steal sequence be restarted with the defensive manager stating his preference (held or not held).  If the “Are you holding?” question was not asked but the defensive manager doesn't stop the offensive manager after the try-for-lead roll, the steal action is played as if the offensive manager had first asked (and received an answer of, "Not holding").

 

T

23.02

As long as they occupy a particular base, you may not pinch-run for a runner who has tried and failed to get their good lead.

 

S

23.1

Use the numeric rating found on the Advanced side of the batter's card, after the letter-grade rating. Here is a sample:

*8-10 / 11, 12 (19-14)

The numbers preceding the slash are the range (when the two colored dice are rolled) indicating when the runner will establish his good lead. The numbers immediately after the slash are the range indicating when the runner will be automatically out stealing. Better base stealers have no automatic outs; you will see a hyphen (-) instead of a number range.

 

S

23.11

Players who steal often have an asterisk (*) in front of their good-lead range. The asterisk indicates that if the defensive manager does not elect to hold the runner, the runner automatically achieves his good lead (when stealing 2nd). If a runner does not have an asterisk, or if he has an asterisk but is held on base (or is stealing 3rd or home), he must roll the two colored dice to determine whether he achieves his good lead.  (See S29.2)

 

S

23.12

Most pitchers and some batters have no number rating for stealing. If these players attempt a steal, they begin with a success chance of 0. After all adjustments (for hold, etc.), their minimum success is 1. Some pitchers have Supplementary Stealing ratings. These pitchers will be identified on the roster sheet.

 

S

23.13

When stealing second, the two numbers in parentheses indicate the runner's stealing success ratings (on a roll of the 20-sided die); the first when he has his good lead, the second when he does not.

 

S

23.2

If the runner attempts to achieve his good lead and succeeds, he must attempt to steal immediately. So you will want to calculate his success chance first. Here is a typical sequence for determining whether to steal and how to do it:

 

 


 

S

23.3

STEALING SECOND BASE

A. Combine the catcher's arm (which will range from -5 to +5) and the pitcher's hold rating (which will range from -6 to +9). This sum may not exceed the range of -5 to +5.

Example: Catcher's arm is -1, pitcher's hold is -5. Instead of a combined -6, the adjustment is -5. Adjust the runner's success ratings accordingly. Example: Instead of (19-14) above, this runner is now 14-9 after a -5 catcher/pitcher adjustment.

B. The defensive manager decides whether to hold the runner on base. If so, there is further adjustment: ‑2 from the first steal success rating and -4 from the second steal success rating.

Example: Instead of 14-9, this runner is now 12-5. Note that the effect of holding the runner is applied after calculating the catcher/pitcher adjustment, so the total effect can exceed -5.

C. The offensive manager decides whether to attempt a steal. If so, then first check to determine if the runner achieves his good lead.

1. If the runner has an asterisk (*) rating and the runner is not being held on first base, then the runner automatically has his good lead.

2. If the runner does not have an asterisk (*) or he has an asterisk and is being held on base, then roll the two colored dice and check the runner's number range(s). (See S29.2 for more on dice rolling.) If the roll falls within the range of the first set of numbers, the runner achieves his good lead. If the roll falls within the range of the second set of numbers, the runner is automatically out stealing. If the roll does not fall within either range, the runner has failed to achieve his good lead.

D. If the runner rolls for his good lead and achieves it, he must steal immediately. If the runner fails to achieve a good lead, he has the option of stealing at any time, or of holding his base.  The runner may make only one attempt for a good lead while he occupies the same base, unless:

1. If a runner being held on base attempts and fails to achieve a good lead, he may try for the good lead once more if the defensive manager later decides to cease holding the runner on base.  Note that if the runner has an asterisk (*) rating, he would automatically have a good lead if the hold were removed.

2. If the defensive manager changes his pitcher or catcher and the pitcher has a worse hold or the catcher has a worse arm.

E. If a steal is attempted, use the runner's adjusted first success rating if he has his good lead, and his adjusted second success rating if he fails to achieve his good lead. If the runner is not being held on base, his adjusted success rating may exceed 19, in which case he is automatically safe. If he is held on, then his success rate may not exceed 19. His success rate may not be lower than 1.

 

S

23.31

On a successful steal with a dice roll of 1, 2, or 3, there is a possible throwing error by the catcher. Roll the 20-sided die again. Refer to the catcher's card for his "T" number(s). If the second roll is within the "T" range, the catcher has committed a throwing error, allowing all runners to advance one additional base. If the second roll was outside the catcher's "T" range, no error occurs. If the defensive manager decides that the risk of the throwing error is greater than the value of attempting to throw the runner out, the catcher may elect to hold the ball rather than attempt the throw. This decision is made after the offensive manager has announced his intention to steal and before the 20-sided die is rolled to determine safe/out. If the catcher elects to hold the ball, the runner(s) safely steals the base and there is no possibility of a throwing error.

 

S

23.4

STEALING THIRD BASE

To steal third, the runner will be using his adjusted second steal-success rating. So if he is being held on base, deduct 4 from his rating as well as the catcher/pitcher effect.

Example: The (19-14) stealer above held on base by a pitcher with a +1 hold and a catcher with a -2 arm, would have a success range of 9 (14 -4 +1 -2 = 9). Ignore the runner's asterisk on attempted steals of third base and home. He must roll within the range of his good lead in order to attempt these steals. If he fails to achieve his good lead, he may not attempt to steal. If the roll falls within the range for his automatic outs, then he is out stealing. Otherwise, follow the instructions above for stealing second base.

 

 

 


 

S

23.5

STEALING HOME

To steal home, the runner will be using his adjusted second steal-success rating. But there is no adjustment for the catcher/pitcher effect. Instead, deduct 9 from his second steal-success rating. And if he is being held on base, deduct an additional 4.

Example: The (19-14) stealer above will have a success range of 1-5 if stealing home while not being held, and a success range of 1 if being held. Ignore the runner's asterisk on attempted steals of third base and home. He must roll within the range of his good lead in order to attempt these steals. If he fails to achieve his good lead, he may not attempt to steal. If the roll falls within the range for his automatic outs, then he is out stealing.

 

S

23.6

DOUBLE/TRIPLE STEALS

In double or triple steals, only the lead runner's ratings will be used. The defense may attempt to throw out the lead runner only. The trail runner(s) automatically advance one base.

 

S

23.7

FORCED STEALS

If the lead runner has not yet rolled for the good lead when a Hit and Run or squeeze result requires the runner(s) to steal, then do so (if required) and proceed normally, making all necessary adjustments. If the runner has previously failed to achieve the good lead and is subsequently required to steal, then proceed as you would for a runner who does not have a good lead. If the lead runner is on second or third base and he fails (or has already failed) to obtain a good lead, he is automatically out trying to steal.

 

S

23.8

HOLDING RUNNERS ON BASE

 

S

23.81

A runner may be held on base when the infield is playing Back or in at the corners.

 

S

23.82

Depending on the runner's base, he is held on by different fielders. When holding a runner on first with a LH batter up, the first baseman and shortstop are responsible for the hold. When holding a runner on first with a RH batter up, the first baseman and second baseman are responsible. When holding a runner on second with a LH batter up, the shortstop is responsible. When holding a runner on second with a RH batter up, the second baseman is responsible and when holding the runner on third, the third baseman is responsible.

 

S

23.83

When an infielder is responsible for holding a runner and a gb()X is hit to him, add 1 to that fielder's range rating and any result off the X-chart followed by a pound sign results in a SINGLE**. Example: With a runner held at first and a lefthanded hitter at the plate, a shortstop rated 2e20 becomes 3e20 and a 4e5 first-baseman becomes a 5e5. The maximum range rating is 5. 

 

S

23.84

Do not award a SINGLE** on a "gb()+" while runners are being held on base. Instead, when a gb()X to an infielder responsible for holding the runner results in a symbol followed by a "#", change that result to "SI2" (single, with all runners advancing two bases).

 

S

23.85

When a runner is held on first or second base, subtract 1 from his running rating when that rating is needed to determine whether he can advance an extra base on another player's hit. If the runner is not being held, add 1 to his running rating.  (See 13.2)

 

T

23.9

STPC does not use the delayed steal of home rule.

 

S

24.0

PICKOFFS AND BALKS

Pickoffs and balks are possible when using the Supplementary Stealing System (see S29.2).

 

S

25.0

INJURIES

Injuries may occur to any batter (including pinch-hitters), if the result of your dice roll includes the phrase, "plus injury."

 

T

25.1

All injuries are for the rest of the current game only.

T

25.2

Position Player (Hitter) Injuries.  If, as the result of an injury, all defensive positions cannot be covered, the manager may complete the offensive inning making any legal (*) moves he wishes.  Note that the injured player must be immediately replaced if he made it to first base but that replacement is not required to remain in the game.  When the defense takes the field, the manager may designate any non-pitcher that is currently in the game or any bench non-pitcher (who has not played in the game) to play at a defensive position that is not on his card.  If there are no non-pitchers available, the manager may designate a pitcher to play at a non-pitching defensive position.  Note that the pitcher does not need to be eligible to pitch but must otherwise be eligible to play.  In the unlikely event that there are no players eligible to cover the line-up position of the injured player, the injured player will stay in the game but with max-bad defense and hitting with the 1W hitter’s pitching card (retaining his stance).  In all cases, any player who is playing out of position will have the worst possible defense (5 range, maximum error, +5 arm, 20 PB, 20 T-rating) and must remain there for the rest of the game (except he’s removed from the game if injured and may be moved to a position that he can legally play if his team suffers another injury).  (*) A legal move in this context is any move that will not require an additional player to play at a position that is not on his card.  So, if (because of an injury) you were going to have one player playing out of position, you couldn’t make a move that would increase that to two players playing at a position that was not on their card.

 

Pitcher Injuries.  Relief pitchers (or starting pitchers that have pitched more than five innings) are removed immediately after an injury.  If a starting pitcher is injured and has not pitched 5 innings, the manager of the injured pitcher has the option of removing him at any time after the injury.  If he stays in the game, he is weak and must be removed before he bats or pitches in the 6th inning.

 

T

25.21

STPC does not use the OUTFIELD FIELDING ADJUSTMENT chart.

 

T

25.3

BRINGING IN A POSITION PLAYER TO PITCH
When (and only when) the last available pitcher has used up his innings (or was injured, pinch hit for or pinch run for), a manager must bring in a position player to pitch. Use the Hitter's Pitching Card while a position player is pitching.  (See the bottom of Page 8 for a copy of the Hitter’s Pitching Card.)  Assume that a left-handed batter throws left and right-handed batters and switch hitters throw right.  If there are no available position players left on the bench, a pitcher who is not eligible to pitch in the game but has not been used enters the game to play the position of the player who will pitch using the hitter's pitching card.  (*)  The pitcher who enters the game will have the worst possible defense at the position and must stay there unless injured (another pitcher would be brought in if that happened). When a position player is pitching, you may make legal moves and substitutions.  For example, if the pitcher has first base on his card, he may switch places with the first baseman.  However, if a pitcher has been relieved and goes off to play another position, he may not pitch again during that game.  After all such moves have been exhausted; the pitcher must finish the game (exempt from the 4-inning rule).  

 

(*)  Another option would be to have the pitcher stay in the game but switch places with a fielder.  As above, that pitcher would play the fielder’s position with max-bad defense and the fielder would pitch using the hitter’s pitching card.  This would be the only option if there were no one available on the bench – not even a starting pitcher.  Note that in these bench-empty situations, a subsequently injured player must stay in the game with max-bad defense and hitting using the pitcher’s 1W hitting card (retaining his stance) and an injured pitcher would switch and play a non-pitching position per above.

 

T

26.0

RESTING BATTERS

STPC does not rest batters.  All position players can play in every game (unless injured).  See T10.11 for eligibility and usage.

 


 

S

27.0

PITCHER ENDURANCE

Find each pitcher's point of weakness (POW) inning in the upper right portion of the Advanced side of his card. The POW Inning is the number in parentheses following the word "starter" or "relief" and is the inning of work when the pitcher becomes vulnerable to fatigue. If a pitcher is both a starter and reliever, he will have two different POW innings.

 

S

27.1

All Advanced-side pitcher cards have out readings followed by a dot. When a pitcher is fatigued, these readings change from their original outs to SINGLE**.

 

S

27.2

Once a pitcher becomes fatigued, it cannot be overcome, no matter how well he pitches afterwards. So we strongly recommend that you relieve a fatigued pitcher.

 

S

27.3

Two ways a pitcher can become fatigued (or weak) are (see S27.55, S27.63 and the Closer Rule for other ways):

A.  He reaches his POW inning (or any inning after that) and allows any combination of three hits or unintentional walks in the same inning. He’s fatigued with the next batter after the third hit or walk.

B.  He reaches his POW inning (or any inning after that) and allows any combination of four hits or unintentional walks in any two consecutive innings. He’s fatigued with the next batter after the fourth hit or walk. Intentional walks, batters hit by a pitch or errors do not contribute to a pitcher's becoming fatigued. Nor do any hits or walks that occur before the pitcher's POW inning.

Example: A starting pitcher with a POW inning of 6 becomes fatigued as soon as the third hit or unintentional walk occurs in the 6th inning. Or, he retires the side in order in the 6th, but becomes fatigued by yielding two walks in the 7th inning and two hits in the 8th.

 

Fatigue determination for relievers is the same as starters but note that a reliever may become vulnerable to fatigue mid-inning.  For example, a reliever who enters the game with 1 out starts his 2nd inning of work after 1 out in the next inning. A reliever with a POW inning of 1 is immediately vulnerable to fatigue. He could become fatigued by yielding 3 hits or unintentional walks without recording an out. A reliever with a POW inning of 2 would become vulnerable after he has recorded 3 outs (i.e. worked one inning).  Example 1:  A reliever with a POW inning of 2 enters the game with one out in the 6th inning. He becomes vulnerable after 1 out in the 7th. Then, after getting the 2nd out in the 7th, he walks the next 2 batters before getting the 3rd out. But he allows a single to the leadoff batter in the 8th and becomes fatigued because he has allowed 3 hits/walks in an inning after becoming vulnerable.  Example 2: A reliever with a POW inning of 2 enters the game with one out in the 6th so becomes vulnerable after one out in the 7th.  He then gives up two walks before getting the next two batters out.  He gets the lead-off batter in the 8th but then gives up 2 singles and becomes weak because he’s allowed four hits or unintentional walks in two consecutive innings after becoming vulnerable.  Example 3: A reliever with a POW inning of 1 enters the game with one out in the 6th and is immediately vulnerable.  He gets the first two guys out to finish the 6th inning.  He gives up two hits to start the 7th inning and then gets the next batter out before giving up another hit.  He is NOT weak at this point because he started his 2nd inning of work after recording his first out of the 7th inning.  NOTE: The computer game calculates reliever weakness differently and would consider the reliever weak in all 3 of these cases.

 

T

27.45

It is the responsibility of the defensive manager to know whether or not his pitcher has become fatigued.  All dot hits count regardless of whether the defensive manager was aware that his pitcher was weak.

 

T

27.51

STPC does not use the Starting Pitcher Rest Chart or the Reliever Rest Rule (S27.65).

 

T

27.52

A pitcher who is eligible to either start or relieve (see T10.2) and who was used in relief in his last outing, must rest at least 3 games before starting.

 

T

27.53

Only pitchers who have ‘starter’ on their card and pitched 125 or more innings may start (See T10.2).

 

T

27.54

A starting pitcher must be relieved after the 10th inning (See T10.2).

 

S

27.55

A starter who "doesn't have it" may "lose his stuff" before his POW inning. If a starter gives up 5 runs in any one inning, 6 runs in any two consecutive innings, or 7 runs in any three consecutive innings, consider him fatigued and convert all readings followed by dots to SINGLE**.

 

T

27.62

A pitcher may only be used in relief if they have ‘reliever’ on their card and pitched 40 or more innings.

 

S

27.63

The maximum number of innings a reliever can pitch without fatigue is his POW inning, plus 2.

 

T

27.64

Relief pitchers cannot be used more than three straight games (See T10.2) and can’t pitch more than four innings in any four consecutive games.

 

S

28.0

CLOSER RULE

Each reliever is given a second POW rating, call it "closer endurance." For example, a rating of "relief (2)/3" indicates a regular POW inning of 2 and a closer endurance rating of 3.

 

S

28.1

Closer ratings range from 0-6, with 6 being the big-league's most frequent and successful closers. A relief pitcher can also be rated "N" for closer endurance; this is the worst rating a closer can have.

 

S

28.2

Closer endurance is the duration, measured in number of outs, a pitcher can maintain his effectiveness in closer situations. In Strat-O-Matic, a "closer situation" is defined differently than a big-league save opportunity. Your pitcher will be in a "closer situation" whenever you have the lead in the 9th inning or later and the tying run is on base or at bat.

 

S

28.3

A pitcher may enter a game in a closer situation or a game he already has entered may suddenly become a closer situation. Here are some rules to govern both possibilities:

 

S

28.31

The closer rules do not affect the current game's starting pitchers, who always use their starter POW inning (even for starting pitchers who have ratings both as starters and relievers).

 

S

28.32

Each reliever enters the game using either his closer endurance (if the game is already a closer situation) or his regular POW inning (if the game is not currently a closer situation).

 

S

28.33

If a reliever (who did not start the game) begins his appearance with his regular POW inning and the game becomes a closer situation, he changes to his closer endurance rating (S27.2 applies). At that time, reduce his closer endurance by the number of outs he has already recorded. This number cannot be reduced to lower than 0 but an “N” closer would be immediately weak.

 

S

28.34

Once a pitcher begins to use his closer endurance rating, that is his endurance for the remainder of his appearance, even if the score changes and the game no longer is a closer situation (S27.63 applies).

Example: A reliever enters the game in the bottom of the 9th inning with a 3-2 lead - a closer situation. The opposing team ties the score in the bottom of the 9th. In the top of the 10th, the pitcher's team scores four times. If the same pitcher remains in the game for the bottom of the 10th, he is still using his closer endurance rating to determine when he becomes fatigued.

 

S

28.35

The closer endurance rating is the number of outs the pitcher can record before becoming susceptible to fatigue. Once this number has been reached, reducing his endurance rating to 0, he becomes fatigued as soon as he allows a hit or unintentional walk.

Example: A pitcher with a closer endurance rating of 0 will become fatigued (if closer situation) as soon as he surrenders a hit or walk, while a pitcher with closer endurance of 6 can pitch two full innings without risking fatigue (due to Closer Rule).

 

S

28.36

Any pitcher with a closer endurance rating of "N" is immediately considered fatigued with the first batter he faces in a closer situation.

 


 

S

28.37

As with any fatigued pitcher, once a reliever becomes fatigued under the terms of the Closer Rule, out readings followed by dots become SINGLE**.

 

S

28.38

When using the Closer Rule, also be sure to use S27.63 (which limits a reliever's innings to his relief POW inning plus 2, when he automatically becomes fatigued).

S

29.0

INDIVIDUAL BALKS, WILD PITCHES, PASSED BALLS (AND DICE ROLLING)

At the top of the Advanced side of their cards, each pitcher is rated individually for his balk (bk) and wild pitch (wp) frequency. And each catcher is rated for his passed ball (pb) frequency. Each is on a scale of 0-20, with 0 being the best, resulting in the fewest of these plays. To use these ratings, follow these rules whenever there is at least one runner on base:

 

T

29.1

WHEN PITCHING TO BATTERS

STPC does not use the SOM method for rolling the dice (See T29.11 for approved methods).  With runners on base, first roll only the 20-sided die (you may pre-roll a six-sided die along with the 20-sider to be used in case C if you wish).

A.  If the 20-sided die roll is 3-20, there will be no wild pitch, balk or pass ball.  Continue as normal (See T29.11).

B.  If the 20-sided die roll is 1, a wild pitch may occur. Refer to the pitcher's wild-pitch rating and roll the 20-sided die again. If the number rolled is less than or equal to the wild-pitch rating, a wild pitch occurs and all runners advance one base.

C.  If the 20-sided roll is 2, a balk or passed ball may occur. Roll the white 6-sided die first. If it comes up 1, 2, or 3, a balk may occur. If it comes up 4, 5, or 6, a passed ball may occur. In either case, roll the 20-sided die again and refer to the appropriate rating (the pitcher's balk rating or the catcher's passed ball rating). If the number rolled is less than or equal to the rating, then a balk or passed ball occurs and all runners advance one base.

D.  If your initial roll of the 20-sided die yields a 1 or 2, but no wild pitch, balk or passed ball occurs, continue as normal (T29.11).  If a wild pitch, balk or passed ball did occur, again roll only the 20-sided die for another possible wild pitch, balk or pass ball (except if the bases are now empty, continue as normal).  In this fashion, more than one of these events can occur while a single batter is at the plate.

 

T

29.11

Dice Rolling

For tournament play with one or more runners on, STPC requires players to pre-roll the 20-sided die for the balk, wild pitch and passed ball and then roll the three six-sided dice for the batter. If the 20-sided die is not a 1 or 2, the six-sided dice must then be rolled immediately for the batter. No changes of strategy or players can then be made. STPC also allows players to roll the 20-sided die with the three six-sided dice. The 20-sided die then applies to any split roll or X-chart range rating. If you roll the three six-sided dice with a runner on base and have not pre-rolled the 20-sided die, you forfeit the balk, wild pitch or passed ball roll for that batter.  The 20-sided die is also rolled first to check for wp/bk/pb for sacrifice, squeeze and hit & run situations but no dice are rolled for intentional walks.

 

T

29.12

When using a dice tower, the following rules govern whether the roll counts. When rolling for a batter, all three six-sided dice must lie flat in the tray. If any fall out or are cocked, all three must be re-rolled. When rolling the 20-sided die with the three six-sided dice for a batter, the 20-sided die only counts if the three six-sided dice are legal. If the three six-sided dice are legal and the 20-sided die falls out of the tray or is cocked, the three six-sided dice count and only the 20-sided die must be re-rolled. When rolling for sacrifice or squeeze play, all three six-sided dice should be rolled. It is legal to roll only the two red dice, but they must both be legal. The white die is then rolled if needed. If all three dice are rolled, they must all be legal for the roll to count.

 

T

29.13

You may not make moves once the dice roll has been initiated.  For example, with runners on base, the roll is considered initiated after the 20-sider has been successfully rolled (i.e. for wp/bk/pb check).  But if the 20-sider came out of the tray, you could make moves because the roll had not been initiated.  Also, if the result was a wp, pb, bk or any result which requires a re-roll with the same batter at the plate, you may make legal moves such as pinch-hitting or bringing in a new shortstop.

 

S

29.2

WHEN RUNNERS ATTEMPT TO STEAL

When rolling for a lead in the Supplementary Stealing System, roll the 20-sided die along with the two 6-sided colored dice.

A. If the 20-sided die roll is 3-20, discard the 20-sided die and continue normally with the Supplementary Stealing System. (If a steal is attempted, you will need to roll the 20-sided die again.)

B. If the 20-sided die roll is 1, the runner attempting the lead may be picked off. Refer to the runner's second steal success rating (in parentheses) and roll the 20-sided die again. If the number rolled is less than or equal to the runner's second steal success rating, the runner dives back safely, but the runner has failed to achieve his good lead (but may attempt a steal of 2b using the adjusted second success rating – See S23.3). If the number rolled is higher than the runner's second steal success rating, the runner has been picked off.

C. If the 20-sided die roll is 2, there is a possible balk. Refer to the pitcher's balk rating (at the top of the Advanced side of his card) and roll the 20-sided die again. If the number rolled is less than or equal to the balk rating, a balk has occurred and all runners advance one base. If the number rolled is higher than the balk rating, the runner dives back safely, but the runner has failed to achieve his good lead (but may attempt a steal of 2b using the adjusted second success rating – See S23.3).

 

T

29.21

STPC allows the 20-sided die to be rolled first to check for pick-off or balk.  It is not required that the 20-sided die be rolled together with the two six-sided dice (when checking for lead).

 

S

29.3

FIELDING CHART ADJUSTMENTS

The individual wild-pitch ratings also simulate the difficulty catchers have with some wild pitchers, such as knuckleballers. When using this system, the "P/P" and "P/F" readings from the Catcher X-Chart Range Section of the Super Advanced Fielding Chart are handled differently. These readings indicate that a possible passed ball occurs, with runner(s) on base and if no error or Rare Play occurs on the play.  If those conditions exist, refer to the pitcher's wild-pitch rating and roll the 20-sided die. If the rolled number is less than or equal to the pitcher's WP rating, then a passed ball occurs, all runners advance one base and play continues with the same batter up. If the rolled number is higher than the pitcher's WP rating, there is no passed ball and the batter pops out to the catcher.

 

S

30.0

BALL PARK EFFECTS / WEATHER EFFECTS and CLUTCH HITTING

Big-leaguers' power and batting averages are affected by the stadiums they play in. A homerun in one ballpark will be only a catchable fly ball to the warning track in another. A sharply hit ball might get past the infielders on artificial turf, or be a catchable ball on grass. With Strat-O-Matic's Ball Park Effects and Weather Effects, you will feel the effect of every big-league stadium. And some batters drive in more runs than their batting average and power statistics would suggest. These clutch hitters show their worth in Strat-O-Matic.

 

S

30.3

BALL PARK HOMERUNS: Ignore all readings that have a symbol to the left of them. Instead, refer to the Ball Park Effect Chart. Find the home stadium and the correct batting stance of the current batter (L=lefty or R=righty). This is the new dice range for the homerun. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the batter has hit a homerun or a Flyball()B.  Players with weak power (W) may not hit home runs off the pitcher’s card. In this situation, change all Homerun results to SINGLE**.

 

S

30.4

BALL PARK SINGLES: Ignore all readings that have a symbol to the left of them. Instead, refer to the Ball Park Effect Chart. Find the home stadium and the correct batting stance of the current batter (L=lefty or R=righty). This is the new dice range for the single. Roll the 20-sided die to determine whether the batter has hit a SINGLE* or a lineout.

 

T

30.5

STPC does not use WEATHER EFFECTS.

 

S

30.6

When the symbol appears, ignore the first reading. Instead, use the second reading (in italics) beneath it.

 


 

S

30.7

CLUTCH HITTING: Ignore the symbol - and accept the original result - unless there are 2 out with 2nd or 3rd base occupied. But when this clutch-hitting situation exists and the batter's dice roll yields a result with an symbol to the left of it, handle the results this way: If the original reading is any type of out, make it a SINGLE** instead. If the original reading is any kind of single, make it a popout instead.

 

T

31.0

SPECIAL SITUATIONS AND REMEDIES FOR RULE VIOLATIONS AND MISTAKES

In general, both managers are responsible (though usually not equally responsible) for preventing mistakes and rule violations.  In every case, if a mistake or violation has occurred, it must be dealt with immediately upon recognition by either player.

 

T

31.1

A pitcher has only 1/3 of an inning of eligibility left. There is a runner on first and less than two outs. The batter hits into a double play. Remedy: No penalty. The pitcher must be removed and the extra 1/3 of an inning must be entered on the pitching sheet (with a note explaining the over usage).

 

T

31.21

A starting pitcher who is not eligible to pitch starts the game.  Remedy: Start the game over.  The offended manager may also choose to accept the result.  In this case, the starting pitcher (if he’s still pitching) may continue to pitch as if eligible. As for future starter eligibility, the offending manager must note (on his pitching sheet) the eligible starter who should have started that game and that’s the starter who, for purposes of determining future eligibility, is considered to have started that game (i.e. no changes to the rotation).  Normal relief usage applies.  The Game Suspension Rule (T33.0) should be used in FTF Tournaments if starting the game over causes the series to exceed the allotted time.    

 

T

31.22

A relief pitcher who is not (or is no longer) eligible to pitch faces at least one batter.  Remedy: Reset the game to when the reliever had legally retired his last batter and resume play from that point forward.  The offended manager may also choose to accept the result.  In this case, the reliever must be removed from the game and the offending manager must put a footnote on his Pitching Sheet to indicate why this pitcher was allowed to pitch that many innings.  

 

T

31.3

A position player who had previously played in the game and was removed re-enters the game.  Remedy: Reset the game to the point the mistake was made and resume play from that point forward.  The offended manager may also choose to accept the result.  In this case, the illegal player must be replaced and this situation is treated as though he were injured (See Section 25).

 

T

31.4

A team starts a game with an illegal lineup. For instance, no player in the starting lineup rated to play shortstop. Remedy: Start the game over.  The offended manager may also choose to accept the result.

In this case, the offending manager must make the lineup legal by making a series of substitutions.  Any players that remain in the game may not change their batting order position and any player removed in order to make the lineup legal may not return during that game.  If the lineup can’t be made legal, one player (or more, if needed) may stay in the game with max-bad defense.

 

T

31.5

A substitution was made which made it impossible for the manager to cover all defensive positions (i.e. a locked player was removed from the game).  Remedy: Reset the game to when the player was illegally removed. The offended manager may also choose to accept the result.  In this case, treat as though the illegally-removed player was injured (See T25.2). 

 

 


 

T

31.6

A position player is replaced in the game by a pinch hitter or pinch runner but the manager does not announce his defense at the start of the next half-inning.  Remedy: If the error is discovered before the player bats in a subsequent inning or is needed for defense (X-chart result or outfield throw etc.), the necessary changes can be made without penalty.  If the replacement is needed for defense, and he can play the position, play proceeds without penalty as it is assumed that the replacement is playing the position of the player he replaced.  If he can't play the position, he is still assumed to be playing there but with max-bad defense (as when the last player at a position is injured – See T25.2).  If possible, the defense must be made legal after the defensive result has been determined.  If the replacement can not play the position of the player that he replaced and he batted in a subsequent inning, the game is reset to the point just before the first illegal plate appearance by the replacement. The offended manager may also accept the result (no reset).  In either case, the lineup must be made legal if possible.  If not possible, the replacement continues to play the position with max-bad defense.

T

31.7

If a pitcher becomes weak at the same time the closer rule comes into effect, the weakness takes precedence.  For example, a pitcher with a rating of relief (1)/6 starts the bottom of the ninth with a four run lead. He can become weak before it becomes a closer situation. The third hit or walk in the inning will cause the pitcher to become weak. If the same hit or walk that causes the pitcher to become weak creates a closer situation, the point of weakness takes precedence.  For example, a pitcher with a rating of relief (1)/6 starts the 6th inning.  In the 9th, his team has a 1-run lead.  He is weak starting the 9th (See S 27.63) even though this is a closer situation.

 

T

31.8

In the following situations, both managers are assumed to be equally at fault. If both managers agree that a mistake was made, then the game will be reset to the point before the mistake was made. If both managers agree, the game may be reconstructed based on dice rolls. Note that no mistake has occurred unless both managers agree that a mistake was made.  These mistakes must be recognized before the first batter bats in the next half inning.  

      The dice roll was misread.

      The X-chart result was misread.

      The advancement of runners was miscalculated.

      The pitcher's point of weakness was reached and an endurance dot was not read as a SINGLE**.

      Any other mistake not involving the eligibility of a position player or a pitcher.

 

T

31.9

Players that play in more than one league will occasionally have more than one eligible card.  STPC always only uses the interleague card which will be the card with the most at-bats or innings-pitched.  It’s possible for the interleague card to not be eligible (because it only has Starter on the card and has fewer than 125 innings pitched) while another card has fewer innings pitched (but enough to qualify as a reliever) with reliever on the card.  In this case, neither card will qualify. In some cases, a pitcher will have a hitter’s hitting card (in addition to his pitcher card).  STPC does not use the hitter card unless it qualifies as a hitter and would use the appropriate pitcher hitting card.

 

T

31.10

For a team to be legal, it must be possible to field a team where each player is playing a position that is on his card and, prior to any substitutions, it must be possible for any one of the starters to be injured and be replaced in the line-up while legally covering all defensive positions (after possibly moving players around to positions that are on their card). An extreme case of a legal team would be 4 starting pitchers, 12 relievers and 9 position players where each position could be legally covered and one player had each non-pitching position on their card.  EXAMPLE: If you had two players who only had 2b and ss on their cards AND you had no other players who could play 2b or ss, this would not be a legal team because you would not be able to cover all positions should one of these two get hurt.

 


 

T

31.11

A pitcher was lifted for a pinch hitter.  At the beginning of the next half-inning, the new pitcher is not announced and both players miss it.  The error is detected after one or more batters have hit.  Remedy: Reset the game to the point the mistake was made, name the new pitcher and resume play from that point forward.  Note that this is different than the situation where an illegal pitcher (someone who is ineligible due to innings limitations or lack of sufficient rest) is used.  See T31.2 for that case.  EXCEPTION 1:  If the pinch hitter was an eligible reliever or an eligible starter/reliever that wont be required to start in the next three games, then the manager should still announce his pitcher but, if he fails to do so, the pinch hitter is assumed to be in the game as the pitcher.  Note that, under this exception, a position player who pinch hits for the last eligible pitcher is an eligible reliever and would be pitching using the hitter's pitching card.  EXCEPTION 2: If there was only one pitcher who could legally pitch, then the manager should still announce his pitcher but, if he fails to do so, that pitcher is assumed to be on the mound.  If the wrong side of the hitter's card was referenced or the wrong pitching card was referenced, refer to T31.8.

 

T

32.0

SHOOTOUT RULES

In certain situations during a tournament, two or more teams may be tied and a quick method is needed to break the tie.  For some tournaments, STPC uses the Shootout method to break such ties.  The Tournament Director should review the circumstances where a shootout will be used before the tournament begins.  The rules which govern the shootout follow:

 

1.  The ballpark is calculated as the average of the two parks.  If the average has a fractional part, round up if the average is less than 10 and round down if the average is greater than 10.  This is done for both singles and homeruns. 

2.  Die roll determines who bats last (high roll is home), although if some situation exists to seed the teams going into the shootout, (for example teams from different divisions with different records), then that seeding should be used to determine who bats last.
3.  Beginning with the 3rd inning, the first team to lead at the end of any inning wins the shootout.
4.  Each pitcher pitches one, and only one, inning.  At the start of each inning, a new pitcher is named.  For the first and second inning, the pitcher must be a starter (i.e. 125 IP and ‘starter’ on their card).  For the third and all subsequent innings, the pitcher can be a starter or reliever.  That pitcher cannot be removed until the end of the inning and may not begin a second inning.
5.  If the shootout should last more than eight innings, then for the 9th inning all pitchers regain their pitching eligibility (including any pitchers who were used as pinch hitters).  The pitcher for the 9th inning can be a starter or a reliever.  Pitchers are still limited to one and only one inning.
6.  Position players can be removed from the game only if injured. The only other substitution allowed is that the pitcher may be pinch hit for each time through the order.  If the visiting team reaches the 9th spot in the order in the top of the 1st, he may use a pinch hitter in that spot, but the named starting pitcher must still pitch the bottom of the 1st.
7.  The closer rule is not in effect and a pitcher cannot become tired for any reason.

 

 


 

T

33.0

GAME SUSPENSION RULE

The time limit for any series is 45-minutes times the number of games in the series.  The Game Suspension Rule can be used to prevent a situation where everyone is waiting for a series (that has exceeded the time limit) to complete.  If both players agree, the suspended game can be completed whenever both players are available (for example, at the end of the first day).  The game must be completed if it matters for advancement.  If one of the managers is not available to complete the game, the tournament director will designate a volunteer to finish the game for the missing manager if the game matters for advancement.  If the game doesn't matter and is not played, it goes in the books as a tie.  The Game Suspension rule is optional and may used at the discretion of the Tournament Director who should inform everyone before the tourney of the circumstances when the rule will be used.

 

Pitching eligibility for the suspended game is calculated the same as always except you look forward three games (as well as back three games) when determining how many innings each pitcher can pitch (see the next page for an example).  Note that you use the same column on your pitching sheet; you do not create a new column for the remaining portion of the game.  Just after the suspension, the manager must consider carefully the pitchers he uses in his next three games because that will affect who is eligible later (when the game is resumed).

 

If someone with an incomplete game is leaving and possibly not returning, they must leave their pitching sheet with the tournament director.

 

If one player has more than one suspended game to be completed and two or more of his opponents are ready to play, order preference is given to 1) the person coming off a bye (he’s waited the longest), 2) the person with the game that was furthest along when suspended and 3) roll the 20-sider.

 

The Tournament Director may appoint someone to play suspended games for a player that has more than one suspended game.

 

Special Provisions for Worlds

The Worlds is a three-day tournament with a unique format so there are special provisions for this tournament only:

1) All suspended games that occur during the first day must be made up at the end of the day (or before).  If anyone complains about having to stay late, they can be reminded that they’re not staying any later than they would without the Game Suspension Rule.  Consider that if a game is suspended in the 5th inning, everyone starts their next series and the division stays on time.  At the end of the day, those 20 minutes are added back on but only for those involved in the suspended game. 

2) All suspended games that occur during the second or third day must be completed if either player is advancing (or has a chance to advance).  If both players have no chance to advance, the game may be completed if both players desire.  A tie is recorded for a suspended game that is not completed.

3) There are no suspended games in the best-ofs,  All of those games are played to their conclusion.

 

 


Game Suspension Rule – An example

Below is the Pitching Sheet at the point of suspension (13 innings complete in Game 4, game still tied but everyone else is done and the time-limit for the series has been reached).  Billy Wagner is the pitcher at the point of suspension (the manager should circle the “2” to signify that on the pitching sheet).

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Pedro

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curt

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roy

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

Jason

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eric

1

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

Rafael

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

John

 

1

 

2

 

 

 

 

Billy

 

1

 

2

 

 

 

 

Damaso

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

Brendon

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The manager of this team must be careful about who he uses in game 5 because he needs to consider that using pitchers in Game 5 (and 6 and 7, for that matter) could affect who is eligible in Game 4 when it is resumed.  For example, if he uses Billy for an inning in Game 5, he wont be eligible to continue in Game 4 (when Game 4 resumes).

 

 

Games 5 – 8 are completed and now both players have some time to complete Game 4.  This is what the Pitching Sheet looks like as they’re ready to resume Game 4:

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Pedro

7

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

Curt

 

6

 

 

 

7

 

 

Roy

 

 

5

 

 

 

5

 

Jason

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eric

1

 

1

1

1

 

2

 

Rafael

1

 

1

 

1

 

1

 

John

 

1

 

2

 

1

 

 

Billy

 

1

 

2

 

1

 

 

Damaso

 

1

1

 

1

 

 

 

Brendon

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Determining the available innings for the remainder of Game 4 is the same as always except you must look ahead three games (as well as back three games).  So, Eric and John are not available because they’ve already pitched in Game 4.  Damaso is not available because if he pitched, he would have appeared in four consecutive games.  As the pitcher of record, Billy could start the 14th inning and go another inning, Rafeal could go 2 innings and Brendon could pitch 3 innings before the hitter’s pitching card must be used.

 

 


Appendix A

 

Use the following table when calculating the safe chance for runners following an open double, open single, FlyB?, F2 (off the X-chart) and Fly(rf)B:

 

Result    Lead Rnr   1st Trail Rnr   All Oth Trail   Calc for Lead Rnr   Calc for 1st Trail Rnr

-------   --------   ------------   -------------   -----------------   ---------------------

Open DO   First      Batter         N/A             R+A+H+T             R+A+L+M

Open SI   Second     First          Advance (*)     R+A+H+T             R+A+H+T+L+M

Open SI   Second     Batter         N/A             R+A+H+T             R+A+M

Open SI   First      Batter         N/A             R+A+H+T+L           R+A

Fly B?    Third      Second         Advance (*)     R+A+F               R+A+L+M

Fly B?    Third      First          N/A             R+A+F               R+A+M

F2        Second     First          N/A             R+A+L               holds

Fly(rf)B  Second     First          N/A             R+A+L (**)          holds    

 

Where:

Lead Rnr = The first runner that is trying to take an extra base.

1st Trail Rnr = The next runner behind the Lead Rnr.

R = Runner’s run rating.

A = Outfielder’s arm.

H = -1 if held and +1 if not held.

T = +2 if there are two outs and zero if there are less than two outs.

L = +2 if throw is from rf, -2 if throw is from lf and zero if from cf.

F = +2 for Fly B? (but F = -7 when the outfield is IN).   

M = -5 (adjustment for the 1st Trail Runner when the Lead Runner is heading home).

 

Note1: On tag plays at the plate, the catcher blocking the plate rule applies (See S13.63).

 

Note2: If the safe chance is less than 1, increase it to 1 (1 is always safe).  If the safe calculation is greater than 19, reduce it to 19 (20 is always an out).

 

(*) Other trail runners automatically advance if the first trail runner advances or attempts to advance.

 

(**) For this situation (Fly(rf)B with a runner on 2nd), the only out chance is on a roll of 20.  The safe chance is as indicated above.  If not within the safe range and something other than 20 was rolled, then the runner holds.  Note that when a hitter batting left handed misses a diamond shot, this is a Fly(rf)B result.